Goddess’s Harp

harp

 

So this is not really an item created for the home; it was a cosplay prop when I did Skyloft Zelda. I don’t want to get rid of it, so I’m looking for somewhere to hang it.

It’s made of masonite and papier maché clay, so it’s EXTREMELY HEAVY. If you were to drop this on your foot, you’d probably break a few toes. It’s not as smooth and beautiful as one made from wood, but it was faster and easier. But I don’t want it to be too heavy for the hooks or the wall and come down on Ooccoo Jr’s head, so I haven’t hung it up yet.

You will need:

paper and pen/pencil

scissors

marker

a sheet of masonite

drywall compound

glue

dowel rod

jig saw

sandpaper

paint

ingredients listed on the page linked to in #3 below (mostly toilet paper, flour, glue, and some other things)

Here’s how I made it:

 

1. Draw harp on thick-ish paper. Choose the half you like better (kudos if you can draw it perfectly symmetrically), fold in half down the middle, and cut out so that you end up with a symmetrical harp. Trace that onto masonite and use a jig saw (heheh, yeah) to cut out your shape. Be careful, and don’t do this if you’re a minor, etc.harpWIP

2. Screw up and cut through the crossbar. Buy a dowel rod to use as a crossbar. It’s better than masonite anyway because it’s round.

3. Glue it to your base. Mix papier maché clay (instructions on this amazing site) and make your basic bulk on one side. It doesn’t have to (and won’t) look perfect, because we can sand it down, and then use drywall compound on top for finer detail. Let dry for as long as you can – a day or two is good.

4. Find some gold elastic (think chocolate box wrapping) and cut and glue on the not-yet-plastered (heheh) side to make your harp strings. Tie to the dowel rod, and pour some glue on the knots. Trust me. Then plaster over the base to secure.

Harp WIP2

5. Sand a bit (hard to do with the papier maché clay) and put a layer of drywall compound on top. Once it dries, you can carve the designs and sand again and make everything look super good. Or get to ‘good enough’ and call it a day!

harp

 

6. Paint that bad boy! I used spraypaint, but I suppose acrylic and a paintbrush would work too.

Harp finished

 

7. Cut the excess string once the glue around the dowel rod has dried completely. Add a layer of varnish over the spray paint to stop it from coming off on your hands.

8. Be sad two years later when the elastic harp strings start to sag.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s